22 July 2013

News You Missed


Chinese horse cavalry invaded and occupied India for two days.

A tribe of Rastafarian pygmies were observed in Indonesia:
“A number of rangers claim the pygmies grow their dreadlocks down to their waist. The first sighting by the rangers was on March 17 at 6:40 p.m. local time,” said TNWK [The Way Kambas National Park] spokesman Sukatmoko.
He added that several rangers patrolling the park claimed the pygmies were seen moving to the PT Nusantara Tropical Fruit (NTF) plantation. They were seen running from the TNWK forest to the plantation.

“Apparently, many fruit trees, such as banana, guava and dragon fruit, are grown in the NTF plantation area. If the pygmies like fruit, they might have entered the plantation for food,” said Sukatmoko.
And if they don't like fruit, what then?

The Old Town Show vegetables results.

16 comments:

  1. "In the same area, PLA troops had intruded and taken away an Indian surveillance camera on June 17."

    They just don't make invading hordes of marauding, horseback Orientals like they used to.

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  2. "In Mount Kerinci, the creature is depicted as having inverted legs but is very agile among the dense foliage,” said Mukri."

    My stilted imagination prevents me from picturing "inverted legs".

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    Replies
    1. I don't know what that means, either. Mistranslation? Also, that person quoted has the same name as the author of the article.

      This is what some people think an orang pendek looks like.

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    2. Alexander M. Kim7/8/13 10:07 PM

      With the feet pointing behind it – a very widespread and storied folkloric motif ... or observation.

      Beyond the other Scythian Anthropophagi, there is a country called Abarimon, situated in a certain great valley of Mount Imaus the inhabitants of which are a savage race, whose feet are turned backwards, relatively to their legs: they possess wonderful velocity, and wander about indiscriminately with the wild beasts. – Pliny the Elder

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    3. Great find. Pliny is gold.

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  3. I saw this quote and thought of ADC:

    “The majority of Africans live in cities. The bush is depopulated so that’s still full of possibility.”

    http://www.gadling.com/2013/05/07/an-interview-with-paul-theroux-author-of-the-last-train-to-zon/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "My travel books have always been faithful accounts of what happened to me, things that happened, conversations that I had and feelings that I had."

      My approach is the exact opposite.

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  4. Those vegetable results are misleading. They are certainly not a "faithful account" of the current state of amateur agriculture in Bridlington. Where, for example, are the pea aggregates and the lengthy list of turnip-grower disqualifications?

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    Replies
    1. And there are too many onion categories.

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    2. Still, I'm glad you cover "Brid" - Whitby's southern counterpart in the great constellation of Yorkshire seaside resorts.

      Not so many aliens or vampires in Brid, mind.

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    3. I was sure I'd mentioned Bridlington before, but nothing in the archives.

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  5. A past theme of yours:

    Nigeria joins the space race

    The race to Mars is on.

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    Replies
    1. Sending backwards peoples into space is a new progressive concern. Notice no one attacking the guy who said "Don't send aid to Bongo Bongo land" is able to point to any examples of aid to Bongo Bongo land paying off.

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    2. Bongo Land is in South Sudan

      http://www.gurtong.net/Peoples/PeoplesProfiles/Bongo/tabid/187/Default.aspx

      http://southernsudan.prm.ox.ac.uk/details/1930.86.64/

      The anthropologist Edward Evans Pritchard spent time among the Bongo in the 1920s. His son Ambrose is the Daily Telegraph's economics correspondent.

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    3. There's the Bongo Land in Sudan and then there are the Bongo Bongo Lands that you can find even within American cities.

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