Microcebus murinus

One reason for the lack of material here, lately, is that I’ve been busy in inventing a new kind of music. I’m not talking about half-assedly combining two existing genres (i.e. “Country-Rap” or ‘Disco-Death Metal) to produce something less listenable to than its components and then dishonestly claiming it to be new, I mean a style of music that is genuinely original.

To do this I’ve assembled an eclectic group of musicians: Gerhard Spitteler, a Swiss Alpenhornist; Donald and Stefan Tanguy, the famous identical twin Bombard players; Candi with an ‘i’, an exotic dancer who produces various percussive tones and rhythms by slapping her nude buttocks while gyrating wildly; Arthur Hines, who plays the Celeste in a free-jazz manner despite having no arms or legs; child Crumhorn prodigy Billy Nertz (age 8), DJ Gleep on the ‘Wheels of Steel’, Rod Price on slide guitar, and Melvin Barnes, PhD, a homeless man I discovered in the park subjecting innocent bystanders to loud, improvised rants about "the nerve gas conspiracy" (whatever that is).

We hope to debut our nine hour long ‘tone poem’ Short and mid-wavelength cone distribution in a nocturnal Strepsirrhine primate Microcebus murinus (in E) by Christmas.

Comments

  1. Following upon your already declared thesis that music is incessently soundtracking and destroying the world, would it hopefully follow that the "tone poem" being prepared will be one in which all your assembled stellar crew combine to produce . . . silence! Just a thought.

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  2. Music is destroying the world...up until now, when we finally get it right. And hasn't the whole silent music thing been done? We're trying to be new.

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  3. Alright! Glad to hear that, and count me not among those who might doubt your capacity for sheer originality, which of course is not a comparative thing, or a sport, but the only real place where thought can pitch a tent. As referenced in Pete Labonne's great pop anthemn "Sound of Doom", and DG Leahy's opus "Novitas Mundi"; two of the obscure pillars holding up my tent.

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  4. Me...I like P.D.Q. Bach. Peter Shikelie's fine work with bowling balls and fine stemware (together at last, but not for long) which forms the score of "The Seasonings" (A risotto in Sage..)

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  5. I've always thought that the musical world lacks a really good, loud Concerto for Bagpipes and Harpsichord.

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